Making Modest Skirts

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Most women would agree that it is becoming increasingly difficult to find modest clothing. The solution? If you have some basic sewing skills, you can make attractive, modest clothing that you will love to wear!

Both of these skirts were made using the McCalls 2255 pattern. This pattern is quick and simple to make, and the skirts are comfortable and versatile.

Khaki Twill Skirt

Khaki Twill Skirt

Fuschia Floral Skirt

Fuschia Floral Skirt

About the McCalls 2255 pattern

Sample of a modest skirt pattern

  • This pattern runs quite small, and I have to use a much larger size than I normally wear. It’s always a good idea to compare your body measurements with those listed on the pattern before cutting.
  • This skirt is designed to be cut on the bias. However, I have found that it drapes just as well and is much easier to sew when cut with the grain of the fabric.
  • The skirt also requires less fabric when cut with the grain—about two yards for my preferred skirt length (31″).
  • Supplies needed: pattern, fabric, matching thread, and elastic. That’s it!

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18 Comments

  1. Lovely skirts! I make a lot of my own skirts, too. They’re so easy and fun to sew. 🙂 Thanks for sharing!

    1. Thank you, Joy! Skirts are one of my favorite things to sew–they ARE easy and fun! 🙂

  2. Thank you so much for this pattern. I have been looking for a simple elastic waist skirt to make. I hate buttons and zippers as I do not need to add any excess bulk, I have plenty of my own. lol Thank you so much for sharing.

    1. You’re welcome, Donna! I feel exactly the same way regarding excess bulk, LOL!

  3. Lovely, I have never made clothing 🙁 I would love to but I figured it was too hard 🙁

    1. Renee, you should give it a try–sewing is not nearly as difficult as many people think!
      Thanks for stopping by!

      1. I have done aprons, a jean skirt before,and t-shirt dresses .But those were easy 🙂

        1. Sounds like you have plenty of experience–go tackle a new sewing project! 🙂

  4. Cheryl @ Moms in Need of Mercy says:

    Stopping by from WFMW. Would love a tutorial! I have a sewing machine and fabric for projects, but am a beginner, and just too scared to begin! 🙂

    1. Cheryl, I think many people feel anxious about getting started with sewing. I’m hoping to have a tutorial available for this skirt pattern in the next few weeks.
      Thanks so much for stopping by!

  5. Those are very pretty! I agree, modest clothing is hard to find. I have only very basic sewing skills, but I’ve found skirts like these, and making skirts from jeans very easy.

    1. Although I’ve seen skirts made from a pair of jeans, I’ve never attempted to sew one myself. Maybe I should put that on my “To Do Someday” list. 😉
      Thanks for visiting!

  6. My daughter wanted a skirt pattern, thanks!

  7. Ginger Becker says:

    I want to start sewing what kind of machine is best to buy?

    1. Judy Hoch says:

      Ginger, I’m no expert on sewing machine brands. I can tell you that I have a Kenmore machine, and I love it. You certainly don’t need a lot of fancy stitches and extra attachments. Look for a machine that will sew a straight stitch and a zigzag stitch, and be sure that you can make buttonholes with it. I’m sorry I can’t help you more–I’d love to hear what you decide!

  8. Pingback: The Homeschool Mother’s Journal (7-27) | Contented at Home
  9. Thank you for this lovely tutorial. As skirts are getting shorter and shorter these days, or way too long, try these modest skirt patterns and more at http://kosherpatterns.com/shop.html

    If you are computer savvy, you can also try My Sloper, Pattern Making Software for Modest Apparel for the modest-minded generation.

    Thank you!

  10. Interesting observation that “pattern runs small”. Not really. It is ready to wear sizes that have shrunk down for vanity’s sake. I’ve been sewing for over 50 years (I’m 64) and pattern sizes have stayed the same since either the late 60’s or early 70’s (I can’t remember when they changed). That is why it is so important to use a measuring tape to get your personal measurements and compare those to the sizes listed on the back of the pattern envelope.
    Both your skirts are lovely!
    P.S. We homeschooled our children for 14 years; they are now all adults and each doing well in their own fields. Keep up the good work!